Monday, June 06, 2011

67th Anniversary of D-Day

It's the 67th anniversary of D-Day.

On June 6, 1944, the Allies invaded Normandy, France, in their drive to oust Hitler from Europe.

It was a bloody, horrific, and terrifying day.

But it was also a day of hope, especially for the occupied countries.

There's been plenty written about this day, plenty of movies made (my personal favorite is The Longest Day), and lots of commentary. But sometimes, we need to take a step back and look at the individuals who made this invasion possible - the infantryman, the paratrooper, the tank drivers, the landing boat drivers, and on and on.

It wasn't just about military strategies and generals and officers...it was also about the common soldier.

It's easy to group these individuals into one entity: the military. But looking at those men's faces reminds us that each one represents a husband, a father, a son, a brother, a sweetheart. Each one had a family, a friend, a wife, a sister, a brother, a daughter, a son, a lover. Each one sucked up his fear and did what he had to do.

They put aside their individuality for a common cause - and they got the job done.







Remember their sacrifices today.

For more photos of D-Day and a plethora of other information about World War II, visit The World War II Database.

(Photo credits: The World War II Database)

7 comments:

Linda said...

My heart races when I think about D-Day. Indeed, "each one represents a husband, a father, a son, a brother, a sweetheart. Each one had a family, a friend, a wife, a sister, a brother, a daughter, a son, a lover." On D-Day, my Aunt's boyfriend, in a panic, jumped from his little boat and the motor's blades took his life.

Thank you for honoring all of the soldiers and their families.

Linda

Ron Scheer said...

They were also citizens, enlisted men. We lose something important, I think, in a time of an all-volunteer army... Thoughtful post. Thanks.

Valerie said...

You summed it up so well with that last line, Melissa. I for one, will never forget these heroes:)

Linda said...

Melissa, may I quote you in my blog post on Wednesday? If so, I promise to provide a link to your blog.

Here are the excerpts I’d like to use:

“It was a bloody, horrific, and terrifying day.”

and

“But sometimes, we need to take a step back and look at the individuals who made this invasion possible - the infantryman, the paratrooper, the tank drivers, the landing boat drivers, and on and on.

It wasn't just about military strategies and generals and officers...it was also about the common soldier.

It's easy to group these individuals into one entity: the military. But looking at those men's faces reminds us that each one represents a husband, a father, a son, a brother, a sweetheart. Each one had a family, a friend, a wife, a sister, a brother, a daughter, a son, a lover. Each one sucked up his fear and did what he had to do.”

I could also include copyright info.

Thanks for considering my request.

Linda

Melissa Marsh said...

Absolutely, Linda! :-)

Linda said...

Thanks, Melissa!

LT

Carol said...

My dad, Arthur 'Dutch' Schultz, was portrayed by Richard Beymer in The Longest Day. It influenced my youthful perception of dad's war - black and white and bloodless. Not until later in life did I realize how horrendous it was for him,along with the battles he continued to fight into Germany. Years later, I realized the toll that WWII had taken on my family.